Korofina

Take the metro and get off at Acropolis Station on the red line (exit the station from the left exit towards the Acropolis Museum). Continue straight for about a block until you reach Areopagitou Street which runs around the Acropolis area and allows you to view all the ancient monuments around the Acropolis.

You can visit the Acropolis Museum, located on your left hand side. Go in and view the brief video on the Parthenon (upstairs 2 floor). 

Day 2 – Syntagma Square and the National Gardens

Once you enter the hill of the Acropolis, make sure to look to on your right to get a panoramic view of Heirodeio Theater.

Kalimera Athens!


You can also continue walking up on Adrianou Street until its end where you reach the Monastiraki/Plaka area. Roam on the streets of Plaka and definitely sit at one of the cafes and enjoy a traditional Greek dessert.

Day 1- The Parthenon

When you enter Acropolis area, further up, move counter clockwise and enjoy all the different monuments, such as the Temple of Athena, patron of the city of Athens, goddess of wisdom, courage, inspiration, civilization, law and justice, mathematics, strength, war strategy, the arts, crafts, and skill in ancient Greek religion and mythology.

The Parliament was originally the Palace of the first King of Greece, Otho who reigned from 1832 to 1862.

Towards the left of the Parliament, on Amalias Street, you may enter the old Royal Gardens. Once in the Gardens, follow the sign towards Zappeio, which was used during the 1896 Summer Olympics as the main fencing hall. A decade later, at the 1906 Summer Olympics, it was used as the Olympic Village.

A number of historical events have taken place at the Zappeion. It provides access to the Panathinaiko Stadium, which is the site of the distribution of the Olympic flame to each Olympian Host City.

When visiting Greece, most of us foreigners spend a day or two in Athens and then immediately go to the Greek Isles. If you can spare some time, I truly recommend that you spend at least 3-4 days in Athens and its surrounding suburbs. Here is why.

Day 3 - Pool or Greek Riviera

If you are too tired from the previous two days (or from the heat at this time of the year), there is the pool!

Take the metro and get off at Syntagma Metro Station. This is the main square in downtown Athens, as most Government buildings are in the surrounding vicinity. Here, you cannot miss the Parliament and take photos of the traditional guards (called Tsoliades). If you have time, wait for the change of guard. It is impressive!

You will also notice that right in the center of the Parliament building, there is the monument dedicated to the unknown soldier.  

When you enter Acropolis area, further up, move counter clockwise and enjoy all the different monuments, such as the Temple of Athena, patron of the city of Athens, goddess of wisdom, courage, inspiration, civilization, law and justice, mathematics, strength, war strategy, the arts, crafts, and skill in ancient Greek religion and mythology.

Once you enter the hill of the Acropolis, make sure to look to on your right to get a panoramic view of Heirodeio Theater.

Published in July 2016

After visiting the Museum, head straight to reach the Heirodeion Ancient Theater (site of Yannis most famous CD at the Acropolis).

If you wish to have more of a coffee place, or a traditional experience you continue straight down Apostolou Pavlou Street and make a left on Irakleidon Street where you will see a row of cafes and bars.

From Panathinaiko Stadium you can enter the site of the Ancient ruins of the Temple of Olympian Zeus, also known as the Columns of the Olympian Zeus. This colossal ruined temple is dedicated to Zeus, king of the Olympian gods. Constructions began in the 6th century BC with the vision to build the greatest temple in the ancient world, but it was not completed during the reign of the Roman Emperor Hadrian in the 2nd century AD some 638 years after the project had begun. During the Roman periods it was renowned as the largest temple in Greece and housed one of the largest cult statues in the ancient world. The temple's glory was short-lived, as it fell into disuse after being pillaged in a barbarian invasion in the 3rd century AD. Despite this, substantial ruins remain visible today and it continues to be a major tourist attraction.

Take the metro and get off at Acropolis Station on the red line (exit the station from the left exit towards the Acropolis Museum). Continue straight for about a block until you reach Areopagitou Street which runs around the Acropolis area and allows you to view all the ancient monuments around the Acropolis.

You can visit the Acropolis Museum, located on your left hand side. Go in and view the brief video on the Parthenon (upstairs 2 floor).